Archives for December 2016

Happy 2017! Let’s Do This!

Five simple words. What do they mean to you? To a kid growing up in multigenerational poverty, these words can mean the world.  Please help us educate, elevate and celebrate in the New Year! With ACCESS to resources, students who are not thriving at school can get academic support they need to grow and become […]

“How you do this one thing is how you will do everything.” – Zen saying

I know a woman named Theresa. She lives much closer to you than you think. She’s a hometown girl and she attended, but never graduated from Asheville High. She struggled with home issues and told me that she never saw many people from her neighborhood succeed.  She says she didn’t have the confidence or encouragement […]

“Altitude Affects Attitude… Introducing The Elevation Fund”

We are extremely grateful to all our donors.  It’s a community effort to break the cycle of poverty for children in Asheville, and every single contribution to OpenDoors helps achieve that mission.  Monthly giving, specifically, at any level, allows for steady cash flow in unpredictable times and for us to say, “yes” and extend special […]

OpenDoors Best-Fit Schools Program

Students with dyslexia work harder than most students as they attempt to stretch themselves and break new ground every day. We, in close partnership with parents, sometimes ask that students with learning differences take risks and invest in themselves by switching schools and attending what we call a “Best-Fit School.”  These are public, private or […]

Give the Gift of Community

“We have the resources to end poverty. The real question is whether we have the will.” – Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. The syllable “op” – as in optimism – derives from Latin.  Ops was the name of the Roman goddess of harvests. She blessed the activities of sowing and reaping. Add to that the […]

Stop the Clock to Start Over

Rajie left the courtroom, went back to her lawyer’s office, and broke down in hysterical tears. She was almost screaming between gasping breaths, saying she doesn’t go to a “real school” because she has been labeled with behavior problems and therefore attends Asheville High’s Alternative program.  She sobs a familiar teen sentiment,  “No one understands […]